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comparative politics

APOSS #72 “Government-Sponsored Information and Mass Perception in Autocracies: Evidence from an Information Correction Experiment on the COVID-19 in Kazakhstan”

In the 72nd APOSS session, Masaaki Higashijima (Tohoku University) presented his paper with Susumu Annaka (Waseda University) and Gento Kato (Nazarbayev University) on how ordinary citizens respond to government-sponsored information in autocracies. James R. Hollyer (Minnesota), Sarah Wilson Sokhey (Colorado), Scott Radnitz (Washington), and Colleen Wood (Cornell) offered really helpful comments of all manner of issues.

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comparative politics

APOSS #71 “Keeping Receipts: Lessons on Civic Engagement of Autocratic States from Kazakh Advocacy for Xinjiang”

In the 71st APOSS session, Colleen Wood (Columbia) presented her paper on how civil society actors in authoritarian states use the internet to mobilize and advocate for rights claims. Diana Fu (Toronto) and Masaaki Higashijima (Tohoku) provided extremely detailed comments on theoretical and conceptual issues.

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comparative politics

APOSS #70 “Social Pressure and Political Self-Censorship: Evidence from Hong Kong”

In the 70th APOSS session, Samson Yuen (Hong Kong Baptist University) presented his paper on how social pressures play an important role in inducing people to self-censor when facing threats posed by repressive laws. Hans H. Tung (National Taiwan University) and Li Shao (Zhejiang) provided detailed comments on theoretical, conceptual, and empirical issues.

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comparative politics

APOSS #69 “Facilitation Workshops Improve Governance in Low-Capacity Bureaucracies: Experimental Evidence from Myanmar Firms”

In the 69th APOSS session, Dean Dulay (Singapore Management University) presented his paper with Edmund Malesky (Duke) on how interventions that facilitate organizational learning and coordination can greatly improve bureaucratic performance, even without significant institutional reform. Isabel Chew (UBC), Kyosuke Kikuta (Osaka), and Van Tran (Cornell) provided fantastic comments on theoretical, conceptual, and empirical issues.

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comparative politics

APOSS #68 “Everyday Repression in China”

In the 68th APOSS session, Lynette Ong (Toronto) presented her paper on state’s outsourcing violence to third-party agents. Lisa Blaydes (Stanford) and Jonson N. Porteux (Kansai Gaidai) provided fantastic comments on theoretical, conceptual, and empirical issues.

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comparative politics

APOSS #67 “Normative and Strategic Naming and Shaming in the UN Universal Periodic Review”

In the 67th APOSS session, Yui Nishimura (Rice) presented her paper on why states engage in naming and shaming activities. David R. Davis (Emory), Amanda Murdie (Georgia), Charmaine N. Willis (SUNY Albany), and M. Joel Voss (Toledo) offered fantastic, in-depth comments.

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comparative politics

APOSS #66 “Voting for Nostalgia?: Authoritarian Legacies and Political Behavior in East Asia”

In the 66th APOSS session, Sanghoon Kim-Leffingwell (Illinois) presented his paper showing how sentiment for the former regime is a central determinant for political behavior in maturing democracies. Bryn Rosenfeld (Cornell), Darin Self (Cornell), Joshua A. Tucker (New York University), and T.Y. Wang (Illinois State) offered extremely detailed and helpful comments. 

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comparative politics

APOSS #65 “The Impact of Wars on Cultural Tolerance: Evidence from Classical Music Performances”

In the 65th APOSS session, Masanori Kikuchi (Waseda) presented his paper showing that the rate of performing pieces originating from belligerent countries shrinks in wartime and that war outcomes affect the degree and speed with which the rate was restored following wars. on how ministerial portfolios are distributed among coalition parties in Asian-Pacific democracies. Rupal N. Mehta (University of Nebraska, Lincoln) and John Mueller (OSU) provided extremely detailed comments and suggestions.

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APOSS #64 “Partisan Distribution of Ministerial Portfolios in Asian-Pacific Democracies”

In the 64th APOSS session, Jinhyuk Jang (Pennsylvania State University) presented his paper on how ministerial portfolios are distributed among coalition parties in Asian-Pacific democracies. Charles T. McClean (Michigan) and Indriði H. Indriðason (UC, Riverside), and Charles Crabtree (Dartmouth) [me] provided extremely detailed comments and suggestions. Well, the first two did at least.

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comparative politics

APOSS #63 “The Public is Less Likely to Support Women (but not Men) Politicians When They Wear Masks”

In the 63rd APOSS session, Kiho Muroga (Kyushu) and Charles Crabtree (Dartmouth) [me] presented their paper showing that women politicians lose public support when wearing masks, but men do not in Japan. The audience provided extremely detailed comments and suggestions.