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comparative politics

APOSS #93 “How COVID-19 Has Affected Democracy Discourse in China”

In the 93rd APOSS session, Hanying Wei (HKUST) and Ji Yeon Hong (HKUST) presented their coauthored paper with Ting Chen (HKBU) about how COVID-19 has affected the discourse on democracy in China. Yue Hu (Tsinghua University) and Margaret E. Roberts (UCSD) offered amazing comments.

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comparative politics

APOSS #92 “Rent Seeking versus Extraction: Converse Corruption Cycles in Vietnam”

In the 92nd APOSS session, Ngoc Phan (Duke) and Dean Dulay (Singapore Management) presented their paper on electoral cycles and corruption. Siyun Jiang (Texas) and Mai Truong (Arizona) provided extremely helpful comments.

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comparative politics

APOSS #91 “Lost Shields: The Impact of Anti-Corruption Campaign on Corporate Litigation in China”

In the 91st APOSS session, Siyun Jiang (Texas) presented her Chinese politics paper on the impact of China’s anti-corruption campaign on politically connected firms’ litigation outcomes. Fabio Angiolillo (HKU), Zeren Li (Yale), Harunobu Saijo (Duke) provided very helpful comments.

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comparative politics

APOSS #90 “Authoritarian Delegation to Single-minded Agents: Limitations of Political Control in Managing Policy Tradeoffs”

In the 90th APOSS session, Hongshen Zhu (Duke) presented his Chinese politics paper on how local officials’ decision-making in a high frequency and high salience setting. Charles Crabtree (Dartmouth) [me] and Kevin Cope (UVA) provided very helpful comments. Mostly Kevin.

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comparative politics

APOSS #89 “Reenvisioning State Power”

In the 89th APOSS session, Lynette Ong (Toronto) presented her paper on how states repress society and legitimate their rule at the same time. Adam Auerbach (American), Javier Auyero (Texas), and Yuhua Wang (Harvard) provided very helpful comments.

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comparative politics

APOSS #88 “Territorial Consolidation and Third-Party Conflict: Evidence from a Natural Experiment”

In the 88th APOSS session, Daina Chiba (University of Macau) and William Reed (University of Maryland) presented their paper on the relationship between peaceful resolution of territorial disputes and the risk of conflict with third party states in subsequent years. Hein Goemans (Rochester), Sara Mitchell (Iowa), and Krista E. Wiegand (University of Tennessee) provided very helpful comments.

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comparative politics

APOSS #87 “Making Weaponized Interdependence Work: The Case of the Myanmar Sanctions Regime”

In the 87th APOSS session, Keith A. Preble (Albany) and Charmaine N. Willis (Albany) presented their paper on the efficacy of economic sanctions on Burma. Jangai Jap (UT Austin, UGA), Morten Pedersen (UNSW), and Kaitlyn Robinson (Stanford) provided extensive, thoughtful comments.

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APOSS #86 “Pasts that Bind: Memory, Institutions, and the Domestic Politics of South Korea-Japan Reconciliation”

In the 86th APOSS session, Eun A Jo (Cornell) presented her paper on why and how collective memory shapes politics in the domestic and international spheres. Thomas Berger (Boston University), Risa Kitagawa (Northeastern), and Atsushi Tago (Waseda) provided many thoughtful comments.

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comparative politics

APOSS #85 “Divergent Partnerships: National Variation & INGO-State Relations in Cambodia”

In the 85th APOSS session, Mary-Collier Wilks (Stanford) presented her paper on how global scripts are made meaningful in intra- and inter-organizational interactions through a two-step process: (1) operationalization in which the broad script is translated into specific programming and (2) implementation in which local actors do or do not align the script with actual practice in Cambodia. Charles Crabtree [me] (Dartmouth) and Kim Reimann (Georgia State) offered many considered comments (mostly Kim, to be honest) along with a few audience members.

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APOSS #84 “Membership Recruitment Strategies in Single-Party Regimes: Evidence from China”

In the 84th APOSS session, Fabio Angiolillo (Hong Kong University) his paper on the impact of changing social structure on ruling party decision-making in recruiting new rank-and-file members within single-party regimes. Roselyn Hsueh (Temple), Daniel Koss (Harvard), and Jason Douglas Todd (Duke Kunshan University) and a few audience members offered many considered comments.