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comparative politics

APOSS #76 “Credit for Compliance: How Institutional Proliferation Establishes Control in China”

In the 76th APOSS session, Haemin Jee (Stanford) presented her paper arguing that autocrats strategically engage in institutional proliferation, the creation of new information-gathering and punitive institutions. Pearce Edwards (Carnegie Mellon University), Ji Yeon Hong (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology), Jieun Kim (University of Pennsylvania) provided very helpful comments on theoretical and empirical matters.

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APOSS #75 “Subsidies for Sale: Post-government Career Concerns, Revolving-Door Channels, and Public Resource Misallocation in China”

In the 75th APOSS session, Zeren Li (Yale) presented his paper arguing that the post-government career concerns of public officials distort public resource allocation while still in office. Junyan Jiang (Columbia) and Trevor Incerti (Yale) provided very helpful comments on theoretical and empirical matters.

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comparative politics

APOSS #74 “When Nondemocratic Allies are Preferable: Domestic Politics, Asymmetry, and Alliance Cooperation”

In the 74th APOSS session, Yasuki Kudo (Kentucky) presented his paper arguing that nondemocratic institutions are useful for the maintenance of some alliance relationships.  Sarah E. Croco (Maryland) and Todd S. Sechser (UVA) provided extremely helpful comments of all manner of issues.

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comparative politics

APOSS #73 “Can Shared Experiences Reduce Outgroup Prejudice? A Survey Experiment from Myanmar”

In the 73rd APOSS session, Isabel Chew (UBC) and Jangai Jap (Texas) presented their paper on how outgroup prejudice can be reduced. Donghyun Danny Choi (Pittsburgh) and I offered helpful comments of all manner of issues.

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comparative politics

APOSS #72 “Government-Sponsored Information and Mass Perception in Autocracies: Evidence from an Information Correction Experiment on the COVID-19 in Kazakhstan”

In the 72nd APOSS session, Masaaki Higashijima (Tohoku University) presented his paper with Susumu Annaka (Waseda University) and Gento Kato (Nazarbayev University) on how ordinary citizens respond to government-sponsored information in autocracies. James R. Hollyer (Minnesota), Sarah Wilson Sokhey (Colorado), Scott Radnitz (Washington), and Colleen Wood (Cornell) offered really helpful comments of all manner of issues.

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comparative politics

APOSS #71 “Keeping Receipts: Lessons on Civic Engagement of Autocratic States from Kazakh Advocacy for Xinjiang”

In the 71st APOSS session, Colleen Wood (Columbia) presented her paper on how civil society actors in authoritarian states use the internet to mobilize and advocate for rights claims. Diana Fu (Toronto) and Masaaki Higashijima (Tohoku) provided extremely detailed comments on theoretical and conceptual issues.

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comparative politics

APOSS #70 “Social Pressure and Political Self-Censorship: Evidence from Hong Kong”

In the 70th APOSS session, Samson Yuen (Hong Kong Baptist University) presented his paper on how social pressures play an important role in inducing people to self-censor when facing threats posed by repressive laws. Hans H. Tung (National Taiwan University) and Li Shao (Zhejiang) provided detailed comments on theoretical, conceptual, and empirical issues.

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comparative politics

APOSS #69 “Facilitation Workshops Improve Governance in Low-Capacity Bureaucracies: Experimental Evidence from Myanmar Firms”

In the 69th APOSS session, Dean Dulay (Singapore Management University) presented his paper with Edmund Malesky (Duke) on how interventions that facilitate organizational learning and coordination can greatly improve bureaucratic performance, even without significant institutional reform. Isabel Chew (UBC), Kyosuke Kikuta (Osaka), and Van Tran (Cornell) provided fantastic comments on theoretical, conceptual, and empirical issues.

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comparative politics

APOSS #68 “Everyday Repression in China”

In the 68th APOSS session, Lynette Ong (Toronto) presented her paper on state’s outsourcing violence to third-party agents. Lisa Blaydes (Stanford) and Jonson N. Porteux (Kansai Gaidai) provided fantastic comments on theoretical, conceptual, and empirical issues.

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comparative politics

APOSS #67 “Normative and Strategic Naming and Shaming in the UN Universal Periodic Review”

In the 67th APOSS session, Yui Nishimura (Rice) presented her paper on why states engage in naming and shaming activities. David R. Davis (Emory), Amanda Murdie (Georgia), Charmaine N. Willis (SUNY Albany), and M. Joel Voss (Toledo) offered fantastic, in-depth comments.