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comparative politics

APOSS #66 “Voting for Nostalgia?: Authoritarian Legacies and Political Behavior in East Asia”

In the 66th APOSS session, Sanghoon Kim-Leffingwell (Illinois) presented his paper showing how sentiment for the former regime is a central determinant for political behavior in maturing democracies. Bryn Rosenfeld (Cornell), Darin Self (Cornell), Joshua A. Tucker (New York University), and T.Y. Wang (Illinois State) offered extremely detailed and helpful comments. 

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comparative politics

APOSS #65 “The Impact of Wars on Cultural Tolerance: Evidence from Classical Music Performances”

In the 65th APOSS session, Masanori Kikuchi (Waseda) presented his paper showing that the rate of performing pieces originating from belligerent countries shrinks in wartime and that war outcomes affect the degree and speed with which the rate was restored following wars. on how ministerial portfolios are distributed among coalition parties in Asian-Pacific democracies. Rupal N. Mehta (University of Nebraska, Lincoln) and John Mueller (OSU) provided extremely detailed comments and suggestions.

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Uncategorized

APOSS #64 “Partisan Distribution of Ministerial Portfolios in Asian-Pacific Democracies”

In the 64th APOSS session, Jinhyuk Jang (Pennsylvania State University) presented his paper on how ministerial portfolios are distributed among coalition parties in Asian-Pacific democracies. Charles T. McClean (Michigan) and Indriði H. Indriðason (UC, Riverside), and Charles Crabtree (Dartmouth) [me] provided extremely detailed comments and suggestions. Well, the first two did at least.

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comparative politics

APOSS #63 “The Public is Less Likely to Support Women (but not Men) Politicians When They Wear Masks”

In the 63rd APOSS session, Kiho Muroga (Kyushu) and Charles Crabtree (Dartmouth) [me] presented their paper showing that women politicians lose public support when wearing masks, but men do not in Japan. The audience provided extremely detailed comments and suggestions.

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comparative politics international relations

APOSS #62 “Yellow Peril Revived? Anti-Asian Racism and American Public Opinion on China”

In the 62nd APOSS session, Daegyeong (D.G.) Kim (UCSD) presented his paper on the under-explored link between U.S.-China geopolitical rivalry and anti-Asian racism in the United States with a focus on American public opinion. Naima Green-Riley (Princeton), Eunji Kim (Vanderbilt), Diana Mutz (Pennsylvania), and Brain C. Rathbun (USC) provided extremely detailed comments and suggestions.

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comparative politics

APOSS #61 “Too Many Parties but None to Choose From? The Paradox of Opposition Fragmentation in Mixed-Member Majoritarian Systems”

In the 61st APOSS session, Hikaru Yamagishi (Yale) presented her pre-analysis plan on the effect of individual perception of opposition coordination on political engagement. Lucia Motolinia (Washington University) provided extensive comments on extremely short notice.

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comparative politics

APOSS #60 “Why Are Some Public Managers More Committed to Professional norms than Others? An Experimental Survey Proposal at Municipal Level”

In the 60th APOSS session, Sofia Axelsson (University of Gothenburg), Victor Lapuente (University of Gothenburg), and Kohei Suzuki (Leiden University) presented their pre-analysis plan on on why some civil servants are more committed to impartiality and professional norm while others are not and why some civil servants are willing to be innovative to change the status quo while others are not. Simon Calmar Andersen (Aarhus), Tobias Bach (Oslo), Kim Sass Mikkelsen (Roskilde), and Christian Schuster (UCL) provided extremely detailed comments.

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comparative politics

APOSS #59 “Threats Shift Immigrants’ Attention from Their Home Country to Host Society: Evidence from the September 11 Terrorist Attacks”

In the 59th APOSS session, Jae Yeon Kim (Johns Hopkins University) and Andrew I. Thompson (George Washington University) presented their paper on how threats shift immigrants’ political attention from their home country to host society. Maneesh Arora (Wellesley), Shana Kushner Gadarian (Syracuse), Alexandra A. Siegel (Colorado), and Yamil Ricardo Velez (Columbia) and the public attendees offered many useful suggestions.

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comparative politics

APOSS #58 “Insights from South Asia – Post-truth and Public Opinion in Pakistan”

In the 58th APOSS session, Anam Kuraishi (University of Essex) presented her paper on how post-truth narratives inform decision making for the individual in accepting and believing narratives to be truthful. Adam J. Berinsky (MIT) and Charles Crabtree (me, Dartmouth) provided stellar comments – definitely true for Adam, maybe not for me – and the public attendees offered many useful suggestions.

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comparative politics

APOSS #57 “Trading with Pariahs: International Trade and North Korean Sanctions”

In the 57th APOSS session, Keith Preble (University at Albany, SUNY) and Charmaine Willis (University at Albany, SUNY) presenting their project on economic sanctions and North Korea. They argue that economic sanctions limit the ability of the US and its allies from incorporating North Korea into their trade networks and in doing so, undermine the coercive power of economic sanctions. Benjamin Habib (La Trobe University), Justin Hastings (University of Sydney), Jay Song (University of Melbourne), and Lauren Sukin (Stanford University) provided stellar comments and the public attendees offered many useful suggestions.