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comparative politics international relations

APOSS #62 “Yellow Peril Revived? Anti-Asian Racism and American Public Opinion on China”

In the 62nd APOSS session, Daegyeong (D.G.) Kim (UCSD) presented his paper on the under-explored link between U.S.-China geopolitical rivalry and anti-Asian racism in the United States with a focus on American public opinion. Naima Green-Riley (Princeton), Eunji Kim (Vanderbilt), Diana Mutz (Pennsylvania), and Brain C. Rathbun (USC) provided extremely detailed comments and suggestions.

Categories
comparative politics

APOSS #61 “Too Many Parties but None to Choose From? The Paradox of Opposition Fragmentation in Mixed-Member Majoritarian Systems”

In the 61st APOSS session, Hikaru Yamagishi (Yale) presented her pre-analysis plan on the effect of individual perception of opposition coordination on political engagement. Lucia Motolinia (Washington University) provided extensive comments on extremely short notice.

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comparative politics

APOSS #60 “Why Are Some Public Managers More Committed to Professional norms than Others? An Experimental Survey Proposal at Municipal Level”

In the 60th APOSS session, Sofia Axelsson (University of Gothenburg), Victor Lapuente (University of Gothenburg), and Kohei Suzuki (Leiden University) presented their pre-analysis plan on on why some civil servants are more committed to impartiality and professional norm while others are not and why some civil servants are willing to be innovative to change the status quo while others are not. Simon Calmar Andersen (Aarhus), Tobias Bach (Oslo), Kim Sass Mikkelsen (Roskilde), and Christian Schuster (UCL) provided extremely detailed comments.

Categories
comparative politics

APOSS #59 “Threats Shift Immigrants’ Attention from Their Home Country to Host Society: Evidence from the September 11 Terrorist Attacks”

In the 59th APOSS session, Jae Yeon Kim (Johns Hopkins University) and Andrew I. Thompson (George Washington University) presented their paper on how threats shift immigrants’ political attention from their home country to host society. Maneesh Arora (Wellesley), Shana Kushner Gadarian (Syracuse), Alexandra A. Siegel (Colorado), and Yamil Ricardo Velez (Columbia) and the public attendees offered many useful suggestions.

Categories
comparative politics

APOSS #58 “Insights from South Asia – Post-truth and Public Opinion in Pakistan”

In the 58th APOSS session, Anam Kuraishi (University of Essex) presented her paper on how post-truth narratives inform decision making for the individual in accepting and believing narratives to be truthful. Adam J. Berinsky (MIT) and Charles Crabtree (me, Dartmouth) provided stellar comments – definitely true for Adam, maybe not for me – and the public attendees offered many useful suggestions.

Categories
comparative politics

APOSS #57 “Trading with Pariahs: International Trade and North Korean Sanctions”

In the 57th APOSS session, Keith Preble (University at Albany, SUNY) and Charmaine Willis (University at Albany, SUNY) presenting their project on economic sanctions and North Korea. They argue that economic sanctions limit the ability of the US and its allies from incorporating North Korea into their trade networks and in doing so, undermine the coercive power of economic sanctions. Benjamin Habib (La Trobe University), Justin Hastings (University of Sydney), Jay Song (University of Melbourne), and Lauren Sukin (Stanford University) provided stellar comments and the public attendees offered many useful suggestions.

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Uncategorized

AOPSSS has become APOSS

A little spring cleaning was in order around here. As part of it, I’ve renamed the Asian Online Political Science Seminar Series (AOPSSS) to be the Asian Politics Online Seminar Series (APOSS).

Looking forward to seeing y’all at the next session! ✌️


Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #56 “The Growth Enhancing Benefits of Political Exclusion in Edo Japan”

In the 56th AOPSSS session, Austin Mitchell (Texas A&M University at Qatar) and Weiwen Yin (The Education University of Hong Kong) presented their project on how variation in growth related to fiscal decentralization partially results from heterogeneity in political institutions. Nicholas Anderson (George Washington), Debin Ma (Hitotsubashi University), and Tuan-Hwee Sng (National University of Singapore) provided many helpful comments.

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #55 “What Kind of Democracy do Chinese People Want? Chinese Perceptions of Democracy Reconsidered”

In the fifty-fifth AOPSSS session, Duancheng Yang (Renmin University of China) and Yuan Zhou (Kobe University) presented their project on Chinese perceptions of democracy. Siyun Jiang (Texas) and Yida Zhai (Shanghai Jiao Tong University) provided many helpful comments.

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #54 “Bystander Disruption Toward Pro-Democracy Protests: The Role of Authoritarian Repertoire in Myanmar”

In the fifty-fourth AOPSSS session, Van Tran (Cornell University) presented her project on the role of state repertoire in shaping bystander response toward pro-democracy activism, with case studies from Myanmar. Alex Braithwaite (Arizona State) and Jenifer M. Whitten-Woodring (UMass Lowell) provided many helpful comments.