Categories
comparative politics

APOSS #58 “Insights from South Asia – Post-truth and Public Opinion in Pakistan”

In the 58th APOSS session, Anam Kuraishi (University of Essex) presented her paper on how post-truth narratives inform decision making for the individual in accepting and believing narratives to be truthful. Adam J. Berinsky (MIT) and Charles Crabtree (me, Dartmouth) provided stellar comments – definitely true for Adam, maybe not for me – and the public attendees offered many useful suggestions.

Categories
comparative politics

APOSS #57 “Trading with Pariahs: International Trade and North Korean Sanctions”

In the 57th APOSS session, Keith Preble (University at Albany, SUNY) and Charmaine Willis (University at Albany, SUNY) presenting their project on economic sanctions and North Korea. They argue that economic sanctions limit the ability of the US and its allies from incorporating North Korea into their trade networks and in doing so, undermine the coercive power of economic sanctions. Benjamin Habib (La Trobe University), Justin Hastings (University of Sydney), Jay Song (University of Melbourne), and Lauren Sukin (Stanford University) provided stellar comments and the public attendees offered many useful suggestions.

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #56 “The Growth Enhancing Benefits of Political Exclusion in Edo Japan”

In the 56th AOPSSS session, Austin Mitchell (Texas A&M University at Qatar) and Weiwen Yin (The Education University of Hong Kong) presented their project on how variation in growth related to fiscal decentralization partially results from heterogeneity in political institutions. Nicholas Anderson (George Washington), Debin Ma (Hitotsubashi University), and Tuan-Hwee Sng (National University of Singapore) provided many helpful comments.

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #55 “What Kind of Democracy do Chinese People Want? Chinese Perceptions of Democracy Reconsidered”

In the fifty-fifth AOPSSS session, Duancheng Yang (Renmin University of China) and Yuan Zhou (Kobe University) presented their project on Chinese perceptions of democracy. Siyun Jiang (Texas) and Yida Zhai (Shanghai Jiao Tong University) provided many helpful comments.

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #54 “Bystander Disruption Toward Pro-Democracy Protests: The Role of Authoritarian Repertoire in Myanmar”

In the fifty-fourth AOPSSS session, Van Tran (Cornell University) presented her project on the role of state repertoire in shaping bystander response toward pro-democracy activism, with case studies from Myanmar. Alex Braithwaite (Arizona State) and Jenifer M. Whitten-Woodring (UMass Lowell) provided many helpful comments.

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #53 “Japan’s Green Voters: The Role of Social Capital in Women’s movements against Nuclear Power Policy”

In the fifty-third AOPSSS session, Timothy Fraser (Northeastern) presented his project on support for antinuclear candidates in Japan. He finds that communities with stronger bonding, in-group social ties are more likely to mobilize against nuclear power, especially in communities with greater constituencies of women voters. Mary Alice Haddad (Wesleyan University), Jacques E. C. Hymans (University of Southern California), and Nicolas Sternsdorff-Cisterna (Southern Methodist University) provided many helpful comments.

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #52 “Seeking Alliances: Which Movements are Willing to Build Coalitions with Prodemocracy Advocates?”

In the fifty-second AOPSSS session, Mai Truong (Arizona) presented her project on public support towards such cross-movement coalitions. Timothy M. Frye (Columbia) and Henry Thomson (Arizona State) provided many helpful comments.

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #50 “Understanding the Anti-Extradition Law Movement: Grievances and Post-materialism in Hong Kong Protests”

In the fiftieth AOPSSS session, Theodore Charm (Texas) presented his paper showing that grievances towards the government and post-materialist values interact to increase Hongkongers’ propensity to protest. Edmund Cheng (City University of Hong Kong), Tak-Wing Ngo (University of Macau), and Samson Yuen (Hong Kong Baptist University) provided a range of extremely helpful comments.

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #49 “(Un)muting the Fire Alarm: Impact of the Establishment of Appellate Courts on Land Dispute Resolution in China”

In the forty-ninth AOPSSS session, Siyun Jiang (Texas) presented her paper illustrating that the establishment of appellate courts in China didn’t increase the percentage of pro-citizen ruling in court, but it made upper-level bureaucrats more likely to acknowledge lower-level bureaucrats’ misdeeds. Mary Gallagher (Michigan) and Wanlin Lin (University of Hong Kong) provided a range of extremely helpful comments.

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #48 “Policing and Gendered Cases in India”

In the forty-eighth AOPSSS session, Nirvikar Jassal (Stanford) presented his paper illustrating the patterns of exclusion faced by women in law enforcement. Rob Blair (Brown), David Dow (Duke), and Sarah Khan (Yale) provided detailed conceptual and empirical comments.