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comparative politics

APOSS #85 “Divergent Partnerships: National Variation & INGO-State Relations in Cambodia”

In the 85th APOSS session, Mary-Collier Wilks (Stanford) presented her paper on how global scripts are made meaningful in intra- and inter-organizational interactions through a two-step process: (1) operationalization in which the broad script is translated into specific programming and (2) implementation in which local actors do or do not align the script with actual practice in Cambodia. Charles Crabtree [me] (Dartmouth) and Kim Reimann (Georgia State) offered many considered comments (mostly Kim, to be honest) along with a few audience members.

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comparative politics

APOSS #83 “Peacekeeping, Aid and Violence: The Integrated Effect of Humanitarian Aid and UN Peacekeeping”

In the 83rd APOSS session, Shenghao Zhang (Essex) presented his coauthored work with  Han Dorussen (Essex) on the integrated effect of humanitarian aid and the UN peacekeeping operations on violence at the subnational level. Paul Diehl (UT Dallas) and Tim Passmore (Virginia Military Institute) and a few audience members offered many considered comments.

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comparative politics

APOSS #82 “Leviathan’s Offer: State-building with Elite Compensation in Early Medieval China”

In the 82nd APOSS session, Erik H. Wang (Australian National University) presented his coauthored work with Joy Chen (Cheung Kong Graduate School of Business) and Xiaoming Zhang (Hong Kong University) on how to soften resistance to state-building efforts by reform losers. Tianyang Xi (Peking) and Clair Z. Yang (University of Washington) and several audience members provided many detailed and thoughtful comments.

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comparative politics

APOSS #81 “State Building, Elite Politics, and Population Classification: A Comparative Study of China and North Korea”

In the 81st APOSS session, Jung-eun Kim (Heidelberg) presented her coauthored paper with Juan Wang (McGill) on the the differences in the population classification systems of two Communist states, China and North Korea. Peng Peng (Duke) and several audience members provided many detailed and thoughtful comments.

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comparative politics

APOSS #80 “The Legacy of Authoritarianism in a Democracy”

In the 80th APOSS session, Pramod Kumar Sur (Asian Growth Research Institute and Osaka University) presented his paper on the long-run political consequences of authoritarianism in India. Rikhil Bhavnani (Wisconsin) and Harunobu Saijo (Duke) provided many detailed and thoughtful comments.

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comparative politics

APOSS #79 “Governing the Empire: Meritocracy and Patronage in Imperial China”

In the 79th APOSS session, Peng Peng (Duke) presented her paper on how perceived conflict risk determines appointment patterns in authoritarian regimes. Jack Paine (Rochester) and Erik H. Wang (ANU) provided many detailed and thoughtful comments.

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comparative politics

APOSS #78 “Dictators and their Repressive Agents: Authoritarian Judiciary, Information Screening, and State Repression”

In the 78th APOSS session, Howard Liu (Essex) presented his paper on the judiciary system and the principal-agent relationship between the ruler and judges. Fiona Shen Bayh (William and Mary), Brett Carter (USC), and Moohyung Cho (Ewha Womans University), and Matthew Nanes (Saint Louis University) provided many detailed and thoughtful comments.

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comparative politics

APOSS #77 “Party Competition and Turnout: Evidence from Japan”

In the 77th APOSS session, Hikaru Yamagishi (Yale) presented her paper arguing that parties’ decisions to coordinate differentially affect voters’ willingness to turn out to vote. Tine N. Paulsen (NYU) and Michael Thies (UCLA) provided very helpful comments on conceptual and theoretical matters.

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comparative politics

APOSS #76 “Credit for Compliance: How Institutional Proliferation Establishes Control in China”

In the 76th APOSS session, Haemin Jee (Stanford) presented her paper arguing that autocrats strategically engage in institutional proliferation, the creation of new information-gathering and punitive institutions. Pearce Edwards (Carnegie Mellon University), Ji Yeon Hong (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology), Jieun Kim (University of Pennsylvania) provided very helpful comments on theoretical and empirical matters.

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comparative politics

APOSS #74 “When Nondemocratic Allies are Preferable: Domestic Politics, Asymmetry, and Alliance Cooperation”

In the 74th APOSS session, Yasuki Kudo (Kentucky) presented his paper arguing that nondemocratic institutions are useful for the maintenance of some alliance relationships.  Sarah E. Croco (Maryland) and Todd S. Sechser (UVA) provided extremely helpful comments of all manner of issues.